News

Community Foundation to be closed July 1-3

In observance of the holiday this week, the Community Foundation will be closed July 1-3,

🇺🇸 In observance of the holiday this week, the Community Foundation is taking a longer break than we normally take in July. Our office will be closed July 1-3, but we wish everyone in our community a fun-filled holiday!

We’ll be back at it on Monday, July 6, and look forward to working together with you to create lasting impact in Monroe County! #strongertogether

Community Foundation awards 24 COVID-19 Rapid Response Grants in third round of funding

Thanks to the generosity of Community Foundation donors wanting to support local nonprofits during the pandemic and the Lilly Endowment through the United Way of Monroe County’s COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund, the Foundation was able to open another funding round of COVID-19 Rapid Response Grants this past week.

In the third phase, the Foundation awarded 24 grants through a streamlined evaluation process. This grant opportunity supports Monroe County nonprofits with grants of up to $2,500.

Phase III Rapid Response Grant recipients:

  • Amethyst House
  • Bloomington Developmental Learning Center
  • Buskirk-Chumley Theater Management
  • Catholic Charities
  • Center for Sustainable Living – Bloomington Community Bike Project
  • Community Justice & Mediation Center
  • Courage to Change Sober Living
  • Habitat for Humanity of Monroe County
  • LifeDesigns
  • Lotus Education & Arts Foundation
  • Monroe County United Ministries
  • My Sister’s Closet
  • New Hope for Families
  • New Leaf New Life
  • Pantry 279
  • Reimagining Opera for Kids
  • Shalom Community Center
  • Society of St. Vincent De Paul
  • WFHB
  • WildCare Inc.
  • Windfall Dancers
  • WonderLab
  • YMCA of Monroe County
  • Youth First, Inc.

Grant funds will be used immediately for supplies, equipment, remote-work technology, staffing, and to enable our local nonprofits to sustain capacity to serve our community. All nonprofit organizations serving Monroe County were eligible to apply regardless of whether they were awarded a grant in a previous Rapid Response Grant round.

“Monroe County’s nonprofits have responded to this crisis in incredible and innovative ways,” said President and CEO Tina Peterson. “We are encouraged by the creativity, compassion, and commitment exhibited by these organizations during this challenging time. We are proud of the work they are doing despite trying circumstances. Working together, thoughtfully, and collaboratively, we can make a difference for those who call Monroe County home.”

The Community Foundation received 90 Rapid Response grant requests in the three rounds of funding. Fifty-six COVID-19 Rapid Response grants have been awarded for a total of $116,322.34 across the three funding rounds.

Phase II Rapid Response Grant recipients (announced April 10):

  • Amethyst House
  • Area 10 Agency on Aging
  • Artisan Alley
  • Bloomington Meals on Wheels
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Bloomington
  • Ivy Tech Foundation
  • Midway Music Speaks
  • Monroe County Humane Association
  • Stages Bloomington
  • Susie’s Place

Phase I Rapid Response Grant recipients (announced in two groups, March 31 & April 2):

  • All-Options Pregnancy Resource Center
  • American Red Cross Southeast Indiana Chapter
  • Bloomington Playwrights Project
  • Bloomington Symphony Orchestra
  • Buskirk-Chumley Theater Management
  • Catholic Charities
  • Community Kitchen of Monroe County
  • Courage to Change Sober Living
  • Habitat for Humanity of Monroe County
  • Healthnet
  • Hoosier Hills Food Bank
  • Middle Way House
  • Monroe County History Center
  • Monroe County United Ministries
  • Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard
  • New Leaf New Life
  • People and Animal Learning Services
  • Pets Alive
  • WFHB
  • Wheeler Mission Ministries
  • Women Writing for a Change
  • WonderLab

At this time, Rapid Response Grant applications are currently closed. Should additional funding become available, we will announce funding opportunities on www.CFBMC.org. If you have questions, please contact Program Director Marcus Whited at marcus@cfbmc.org.

About Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County:

Created by individuals, families, and businesses who share a passion for Monroe County and a vision for its future, the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County has granted $30 million to more than 400 local nonprofit organizations since its incorporation in 1990. With a growing $33.5 million endowment, the Foundation makes a difference by connecting caring people, important causes, and community resources.

Rapid Response Round III grants open

Thanks to the generosity of the Lilly Endowment through the United Way’s COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund and Community Foundation donors that want to support our local nonprofits during the pandemic, we are pleased to share we have funding for a third round of Rapid Response Grants. Grants will immediately support Monroe County nonprofits to carry out their work for the benefit of those who call our community home. 

Grant amounts ranging from $250 to $2,500 will be awarded through a streamlined application process. Nonprofits are asked to apply by noon on Thursday, May 14. Grant awards will be announced on Friday, May 15.  Read more.

11-year-old delivers message of hope through music

11-year old Audrey Clampitt wanted to do something special for the healthcare workers, and all of the people hunkered down during the coronavirus pandemic.

“At first, I wanted to do something to tell the healthcare workers that we are thankful, and to the world, to say that we can really do this,” said Audrey. So, I decided to write a song, and maybe put piano in it.”

The Community Foundation’s Director of Marketing Betsy Trotzke recently got a chance to interview Audrey over Zoom to learn more about her, her love of music, and what she wants to do when she grows up.

Writing a song was a natural fit for Audrey. “My parents say that I’ve been singing since before I could talk,” said Audrey. She began playing the piano in kindergarten, and since the age of six has written more songs than she can count.

“I just come up with the words, and then if I can, I add music,” she said. “I like sharing my songs with the world, and this was a really good chance for me to do that and get a good message out.”

Audrey lives in Bloomington with her parents Andrew and Abra, and has two younger siblings Naomi (age 9) and Lincoln (age 8). They also have a cat named Hoosier and chickens.

For her Overcome music video, Audrey said she took inspiration from other videos, but that it was her dad who had the idea to film familiar places in Bloomington and on the IU campus that people might be missing.

“That was the first time I ever really created a music video,” added Audrey. “I hope people take away a lot of hope from this because we can overcome this. I know in my family that Naomi and Lincoln keep asking, and I do too, ‘when will all of this be over?’ We just need to know that it will be over at some point and that we can get through this. We will.”

Since schools have closed, Audrey said she’s been using her time at home to work on her music and has taught herself to play the ukulele, a gift she received this past Christmas. Her next song on the ukulele will be about her family, and we were lucky to get a sneak peek.

While music is her passion, Audrey has many other hobbies as well. She likes to bake with her mom, read, and write her own stories. When she grows up, she wants to be an author, illustrator, actress, and songwriter.

“I’m actually working on a book right now,” Audrey added. “It’s called the House of Secrets and I think I’m on page 95. I want to get to 150, then to 200. I want it to be pretty big, because my plan is to publish that, then I want to make it into a musical. Then, I can do all of my things at once – write a book, read it, sing and star in it.”

Audrey’s determination and talent inspire us. Follow your dreams, Audrey! The Community Foundation would like to thank Audrey and the entire Clampitt family for sharing their time and talents to spread this uplifting message of hope.

Audrey attended Lakeview Elementary School this year. She is heading into 6th grade this fall and will be 12 years old in October.

Community Foundation COVID-19 Update

Dear Community Foundation Friends,

Like you, we’ve experienced a lot in the last few weeks. Unprecedented impact on our schools, workplaces, families, and daily lives. Yet, even as we exercise social distancing, our community has come together and shown incredible generosity and kindness.

  • Tailors and sewers are producing masks for healthcare workers and residents by the thousands.
  • Residents are supporting small business with the purchase of gift cards and take-out food.
  • Distillers are producing hand sanitizer and distributing it free to those in need.
  • Broadband companies are offering expanded data and low-cost plans for low-income families.
  • Schools have opened up wi-fi hotspot access for students & members of the public.
  • Neighbors have donated bedding and supplies for COVID-19 shelter spaces for homeless individuals and families.
  • Musicians and artists are sharing their talents online for free.
  • Volunteers have given their time to prepare and deliver food and supplies to homebound neighbors.
  • Healthy people have donated blood during an urgent time of need.
  • Families and friends are checking in on one another over Zoom.
  • Community members have generously donated money to support those families and organizations that desperately need support during this difficult time.

Amid all of this activity — much of which is happening from within our own homes — many of our essential community members go to work each day. We owe tremendous thanks to our hometown heroes: healthcare workers and caregivers, first responders, and those working in grocery stores, pharmacies, gas stations, food service, childcare, and public transportation. We are proud to be a part of Monroe County, and we know that we are Stronger Together.

On March 22, we shared with you the Community Foundation’s COVID-19 Phase I Response Plan. Today, we are proud to share that the Foundation has deployed $148,200.80 to support emergency COVID-19 relief and nonprofit sustainability in Monroe County. The Foundation has granted:

  • $25,000 to the United Way of Monroe County to address basic needs for shelter, food, and medical care
  • $66,193.80 in Rapid Response grants to 32 nonprofit organizations for immediate supplies, equipment, remote-work technology, and staffing
  • $57,007 in fund distributions from donor-advised, agency, designated and repurposed grant funds to sustain the capacity of nonprofits

These grants would not have been possible without the generations of donors, companies, families, and nonprofits in our community that have trusted us for 30 years to address pressing needs and compelling opportunities in Monroe County.

The Community Foundation has also been actively involved with our community’s leading philanthropic organizations to develop a cohesive strategy for social service support during this time of hardship. We are working closely with our partners to address four areas of emerging need: emergency childcare, health and personal safety, shelter, and food. This week the Foundation, through its Monroe Smart Start program, activated an online portal to help identify individuals qualified to provide childcare services for the families of essential workers in our community. Those expressing interest will be matched with childcare providers in need of staffing or with families looking for in-home care. Childcare is an urgent need that must be addressed, and we are grateful to the organizations that are dedicated to providing safe, quality programming for the children of parents who are working daily to meet the essential needs each and every one of us.  View the portal.

Finally, we are also trying to do our part in supporting others who are stepping forward during this time of crisis.  We’ve provided funding to help the Mill launch the Navigation Center – a web-based resource for local businesses and entrepreneurs negatively affected by COVID-19. We are also loaning a technology platform to assist the city in providing loans to small businesses, nonprofits, and cultural groups through its Rapid Response Fund. The Foundation is also joining others in communicating critical information through a variety of channels. 

We are grateful to our partners in philanthropy, elected officials, community leaders, school officials, employers, and early learning providers for their willingness to come together at this time for the good of all who call Monroe County home.

From all of us at the Community Foundation, thank you for all you are doing for Monroe County – and especially for the kindness you are showing to those among us that are most vulnerable. We will continue to be responsive and during this difficult time and encourage you to contact us with any questions you have via phone at (812) 333-9016 or via email.

Thank you,

Tina Peterson
President and CEO
tinapeterson@cfbmc.org
812.327.3303 (c)

Community Foundation Staff

Community Foundation announces 32 Rapid Response grants have been awarded

In the second phase of Rapid Response Grants, the Foundation awarded 10 grants. A total of 32 COVID-19 Rapid Response grants has been awarded through two rounds of funding.

The Community Foundation has been working with past grantees & fundholders to identify ways to repurpose unused dollars to meet emerging needs brought on by COVID-19. We’ve also heard from many donors that want to support our community’s organizations during this crisis. Thanks to their generosity, The Community Foundation was able to open another funding round of Rapid Response Grants this week to immediately support Monroe County nonprofits to carry out their work.

In the second phase of Rapid Response Grants, the Foundation awarded 10 grants. A total of 32 COVID-19 Rapid Response grants has been awarded through two rounds of funding. This grant opportunity was opened to immediately support Monroe County nonprofits with grants of up to $2,500 through a streamlined evaluation process. Grant funds will be used immediately for supplies, equipment, remote-work technology, staffing, and to enable our local nonprofits to sustain capacity to serve our community.

Phase II Rapid Response Grant recipients:

  • Amethyst House
  • Area 10 Agency on Aging
  • Artisan Alley
  • Bloomington Meals on Wheels
  • Boys & Girls Clubs of Bloomington
  • Ivy Tech Foundation
  • Midway Music Speaks
  • Monroe County Humane Association
  • Stages Bloomington
  • Susie’s Place

Phase I Rapid Response Grant recipients:

  • All-Options Pregnancy Resource Center
  • American Red Cross Southeast Indiana Chapter
  • Bloomington Playwrights Project
  • Bloomington Symphony Orchestra
  • Buskirk-Chumley Theater Management
  • Catholic Charities
  • Community Kitchen of Monroe County
  • Courage to Change Sober Living
  • Habitat for Humanity of Monroe County
  • Healthnet
  • Hoosier Hills Food Bank
  • Middle Way House
  • Monroe County History Center
  • Monroe County United Ministries
  • Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard
  • New Leaf New Life
  • People and Animal Learning Services
  • Pets Alive
  • WFHB
  • Wheeler Mission Ministries
  • Women Writing for a Change
  • WonderLab

“The Community Foundation is proud to be working in parallel with our philanthropic partners to address the emergent needs of local organizations during this early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said President and CEO Tina Peterson. “Both the large grant the Foundation made to the United Way COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund and the Rapid Response Grants are meant to ensure that essential organizations have the capacity to lean in during this time of crisis. The Foundation is exploring everything possibility for creatively deploying its resources to support those who call our community home.”

The Community Foundation received 56 Rapid Response grant requests in the two rounds of funding. At this time, Rapid Response Grant applications are currently closed. If you have questions, please contact Program Director Marcus Whited at marcus@cfbmc.org.

Call out for care: childcare a critical need for essential employees and their families

Over 230 children of essential workers are in urgent need of childcare in Monroe County. These families include parents or guardians working as health care providers, first responders, or pharmacists. They are making essential medical products, providing sanitation services, or stocking shelves at grocery stores. In each instance, these indispensable workers need the community’s support to ensure their children are well-cared for while they serve the essential needs of Monroe County residents.

“It is critical that we rally around the families of essential workers,” said City of Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton. “We have childcare providers and others that are willing to reopen existing sites or create emergency childcare locations. However, we need staffing to make this possible. If you are a healthy adult with the capacity and skill set to help, we hope you will step forward and generously provide your talents to care for children in our community during this unprecedented crisis.”

In an effort to assist essential working families and employers, the Community Foundation’s Monroe Smart Start program has developed a tool for healthy childcare workers, educators, teachers, college students, or others with childcare experience to sign up for paid employment opportunities. Those interested in employment can indicate their interest to provide childcare at: https://www.monroesmartstart.org/providers/emergency-childcare

The names of interested individuals will be provided to local childcare providers or employers assisting their staff to find care for their children. Childcare opportunities can be either part- or full-time. Those signing up to help can specify ages of children with whom they are interested in working (6 weeks to age 5, or ages 6-12), and if they would prefer to work in homes or childcare centers. Once information is exchanged, families and/or childcare programs/organizations will work with the potential childcare employee to agree upon hourly wage, work hours, and terms of employment.

“As a community that excels in providing care to children of all ages, we now find ourselves in uncharted territory,” said Community Foundation President and CEO Tina Peterson. “With all public schools closed and most early learning sites shuttered as well, we have a crisis in childcare for essential workers. Given the wealth of local individuals with experience working with children ages 6 weeks to 12, we are committed to helping find the people that will allow existing providers to reopen or for innovative solutions to be activated in our community.”

A taskforce was recently convened to address the emerging childcare needs of essential workers during the COVID-19 crisis. The taskforce is collecting information to help understand the need for childcare, the barriers to providing essential care, and strategies that might be deployed if adequate resources can be secured. The taskforce is also exploring CDC aligned models for care, alternate locations for serving children, and resources necessary to provide care in an environment defined by the implications of COVID-19.

“Staffing is the key determinant for successfully providing the childcare so urgently needed by local families,” added Peterson. “We know our community has many compassionate childcare workers, and this call out for care is a starting point towards connecting them with families who are stepping up each day to ensure that this community has essential services. This is our chance to stand alongside our local heroes in fighting against COVID-19 in Monroe County.”

For more information on emergency childcare for essential workers, please contact Community Foundation President and CEO Tina Peterson at tinapeterson@cfbmc.org or Jennifer Myers, Monroe Smart Start Coordinator at jennifer@cfbmc.org.

Monroe County Emergency Childcare Task Force:

  • Jeff Baldwin, Boys & Girls Clubs of Bloomington
  • Jackie Bond, Indiana Association for Education of Young Children
  • Alex Crowley, City of Bloomington
  • Judy DeMuth, Monroe County Community School Corporation
  • Kristy Fallon, Catalent
  • Efrat Feferman, United Way of Monroe County
  • Angie Frye, IU Health
  • Penny Githens, Monroe County Government
  • Gretchen Gutman, Cook Medical
  • Andrea Mobley, Monroe County Community School Corporation
  • Meleah Monroe, IU Health
  • Jennifer Myers, Monroe Smart Start
  • Dan Peterson, Cook Medical
  • Tina Peterson, Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County
  • Erin Predmore, Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce
  • Natalie Pugh, Chances and Services for Youth
  • Jerry Sanders, Richland Bean Blossom Community School Corporation
  • Moriah Sowders, Boston Scientific

About Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County:

Created by individuals, families, and businesses who share a passion for Monroe County and a vision for its future, the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County has granted $30 million to more than 400 local nonprofit organizations since its incorporation in 1990.  The Foundation makes a difference by connecting caring people, important causes, and community resources. More information can be found at www.cfbmc.org.

Community Foundation awards 5 more Rapid Response grants

The Community Foundation has been working with past grantees and nonprofit fund holders to identify ways to repurpose unused dollars to meet emerging needs brought on by COVID-19. Thanks to their generosity, we are proud to share that we were able to award five additional Rapid Response grants to Monroe County nonprofit organizations that applied in our original funding round.

New Rapid Response Grant recipients include:

  • Buskirk-Chumley Theater Management
  • Catholic Charities
  • Pets Alive
  • Wheeler Mission Ministries
  • Women Writing for a Change

With these additional grants, the Foundation has awarded a total of 22 COVID-19 Rapid Response grants. This grant opportunity was opened March 22 to immediately support Monroe County nonprofits with grants of up to $2,500 through a streamlined 24-hour evaluation process.

These funds will be used immediately for supplies, equipment, remote-work technology, staffing, and to enable our local nonprofits to sustain capacity to serve our community.

On March 31, we announced that 17 organizations had been awarded COVID-19 Rapid Response Grants from the Community Foundation:

  • All-Options Pregnancy Resource Center
  • American Red Cross Southeast Indiana Chapter
  • Bloomington Playwrights Project
  • Bloomington Symphony Orchestra
  • Community Kitchen of Monroe County
  • Courage to Change Sober Living
  • Habitat for Humanity of Monroe County
  • Healthnet
  • Hoosier Hills Food Bank
  • Middle Way House
  • Monroe County History Center
  • Monroe County United Ministries
  • Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard
  • New Leaf New Life
  • People and Animal Learning Services
  • WFHB
  • WonderLab

“The Community Foundation is proud to be working in parallel with our philanthropic partners to address the emergent needs of local organizations during this early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said President and CEO Tina Peterson. “Both the large grant the Foundation made to the United Way COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund and the Rapid Response Grants are meant to ensure that essential organizations have the capacity to lean in during this time of crisis. The Foundation is exploring everything possibility for creatively deploying its resources to support those who call our community home.”

The Community Foundation received 34 Rapid Response grant requests totaling more than $76,000 in requested funds. The first round of Rapid Response Grants has closed. The Community Foundation is developing its Phase 2 response to the COVID-19 pandemic and will release more information as soon as it is available. If you have questions, please contact Program Director Marcus Whited at marcus@cfbmc.org.

Emergency COVID-19 Relief Grants announced by community funders

Funding to uplift crucial nonprofit services during economic distress associated with the virus

The United Way COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund has granted $298,175 to 16 human service organizations providing critical services serving people in Monroe, Owen, and Greene counties.  With support from this Fund, these organizations can continue to provide life-changing services to members of our community affected by the pandemic. Priority needs for the fund focused on sustaining operations of agencies meeting community members’ basic needs, developing safe and temporary residential programs for at-risk individuals served by area shelters, and maintaining or increasing the capacity of local food security systems.

“The Community Foundation is proud to be working in parallel with our philanthropic partners to address the emergent needs of local organizations during this early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said President and CEO Tina Peterson. “Both the large grant the Foundation made to the United Way COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund and the 17 Rapid Response Grants the Foundation delivered to nonprofits last week are meant to ensure that essential organizations have the capacity to lean in during this time of crisis. The Foundation is exploring every possibility for creatively deploying its resources to support those who call our community home.” 

COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund Phase 1 grant recipients include: 

  • All-Options Pregnancy Resource Center – $2,500 
  • American Red Cross Southeast Indiana Chapter – $1,500 
  • Amethyst House – $15,000 
  • Area 10 Agency on Aging – $20,000 
  • Bloomington Meals on Wheels – $7,000 
  • Catholic Charities Bloomington – $15,000 
  • Community Kitchen – $4,175 
  • El Centro Comunal Latino – $12,000 
  • Hoosier Hills Food Bank – $50,000 
  • Middle Way House – $20,000 
  • The Monroe County Food Train – $5,750 
  • Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard – $20,000 
  • New Leaf – New Life – $6,000 
  • Pantry 279, Inc. – $15,000 
  • Wheeler Mission – $35,000 
  • Shalom Community Center (for community isolation shelter) – $70,000 

From purchasing diapers and supporting critical domestic violence services to home delivery of meals to elderly and services to those in addiction recovery, the grants will be used to fund priority needs. Catholic Charities Bloomington plans to use the grant to offer online-based mental health services to adults, families, and children during this time of adjustment and uncertainty. Pantry 279 will use the funds to support the four-fold increase of individuals experiencing food insecurity in Ellettsville and the surrounding communities during the pandemic. The American Red Cross Southeast Indiana Chapter will use funds to support all possible blood donations, as the pandemic has caused a significant blood shortage due to cancelled blood drives and other events. Wheeler Missions plans to hire temporary emergency shelter staff in response to decreased help from their volunteer base. The $70,000 granted to a collaborative project between Shalom Community Center, New Hope for Families, Wheeler Mission, Middle Way House, and Monroe County Health Department will fund a coordinated and secure safe isolation shelter space for individuals currently in mass shelters, a resource previously unavailable in our community.

A committee of cross-sector community partners identified critical needs and resource gaps to guide decisions regarding the COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund. The granting committee includes representatives from the Bloomington Health Foundation, City of Bloomington, Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, Monroe County Government, Indiana University, and United Way of Monroe County.  

Fund supporters include Bloomington Health Foundation, Bloomington Township, Boston Scientific, City of Bloomington, Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, Cook Medical, Duke Energy, First Financial Bank, Hoosier Energy, IU Credit Union, Monroe County Government, Old National Bank, Owen County State Bank, Perry Township, private individuals, Tim Ellis Realtors, Truist Foundation, United Way of Monroe County, United Way Worldwide, and Van Buren Township. 

“We are awed, but not surprised, by the quick generosity of organizations, businesses, and individuals in our community. It’s inspiring to see everyone coming together for the good of all. And we are equally impressed with how nonprofits serving vulnerable people creatively designed, in a matter of days, new ways to serve and support vulnerable people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. United Way of Monroe County is honored to work with our partners to fulfill our mission of bringing together the caring power of our community to help those in need,” said Executive Director Efrat Feferman. 

Read the full press release on the United Way website.

The CARES Act: Info for Nonprofits

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act includes programs (loans, forgivable loans & grants) for charitable nonprofits.

One of the interesting provisions of the CARES Act is that borrowers can receive a $10,000 emergency grant cash advance that can be forgiven if spent on paid leave, maintaining payroll, increased costs due to supply chain disruption, mortgage or lease payments or repaying obligations that cannot be met due to revenue loss.

The National Council on Nonprofits has put together a helpful chart on options, eligibility criteria, terms, and how to apply.

Struggling to know which program is right for your organization? The following questions might help point you in the right direction. Do you need: 

  • Capital to cover the cost of retaining employees? Then the Paycheck Protection Program might be right for you. The program would provide cash-flow assistance through 100 percent federally guaranteed loans to employers who maintain their payroll during this emergency. If employers maintain their payroll, the loans would be forgiven. 
  • A quick infusion of a smaller amount of cash to cover you right now? You might want to look into an Emergency Economic Injury Grant. These grants provide an emergency advance of up to $10,000 to small businesses and nonprofits harmed by COVID-19 within three days of applying for an SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL). 
  • You can apply for both the Payment Protection Program and the EIDL, just not for the same payroll expenses.

Frequently Asked Questions on the CARES Act

Get Started and Apply

To apply now for a Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL), go to http://www.sba.gov/disaster.

For the Payment Protection Program, you will apply through an existing SBA lender or federally insured bank or credit union. Consult with your local lender as to whether it is participating or visit https://www.sba.gov/paycheckprotection/find for a list of SBA lenders.

For more resources on economic recovery, loans, and financial assistance, please visit the Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce’s COVID-19 Resource Hub.